Game Show

Author: 
Kikolani Martinez

 

PukaPukaPukaPukaPuka
PukaPukaPukaPukaPuka
PukaPukaPukaPukaPuka
PukaPukaPukaPukaPuka
PukaPukaPukaPukaPuka
PukaPukaPukaPukaPuka
PukaPukaPukaPukaPuka
PukaPukaPukaPukaPuka
PukaPukaPukaPukaPuka
PukaPukaPukaPukaPuka
PukaPukaPukaPukaPuka
PukaPukaPukaHEOPuka
PukaPukaPukaPukaPuka
PukaPukaPukaPukaPuka
PukaPukaPukaPukaPuka
PukaPukaPukaPukaPuka
PukaPukaPukaPukaPuka
PukaPukaPukaPukaPuka
PukaPukaPukaPukaPuka
PukaPukaPukaPukaPuka
PukaPukaPukaPukaPuka
PukaPukaPukaPukaPuka
PukaPukaPukaPukaPuka
PukaPukaPukaPukaPuka
PukaPukaPukaPukaPuka
DoahDoahDoahDoahDoah
DoahDoahDoahDoahDoah
DoahDoahDoahDoahDoah
DoahDoahDoahDoahDoah
DoahDoahDoahDoahDoah
DoahDoahDoahDoahDoah
DoahDoahDoahDoahDoah
DoahDoahDoahDoahDoah
DoahDoahDoahDoahDoah
DoahDoahDoahDoahDoah
DoahDoahDoahDoahDoah
DoahDoahDoahhandoDoah
DoahDoahDoahDoahDoah
DoahDoahDoahDoahDoah
DoahDoahDoahDoahDoah
DoahDoahDoahDoahDoah
DoahDoahDoahDoahDoah
DoahDoahDoahDoahDoah
DoahDoahDoahDoahDoah
DoahDoahDoahDoahDoah
DoahDoahDoahDoahDoah
DoahDoahDoahDoahDoah
DoahDoahDoahDoahDoah
DoahDoahDoahDoahDoah
DoahDoahDoahDoahDoah 
DoorDoorDoorDoorDoor
DoorDoorDoorDoorDoor
DoorDoorDoorDoorDoor
DoorDoorDoorDoorDoor
DoorDoorDoorDoorDoor
DoorDoorDoorDoorDoor
DoorDoorDoorDoorDoor
DoorDoorDoorDoorDoor
DoorDoorDoorDoorDoor
DoorDoorDoorDoorDoor
DoorDoorDoorDoorDoor
DoorDoorDoorKnobDoor
DoorDoorDoorDoorDoor
DoorDoorDoorDoorDoor
DoorDoorDoorDoorDoor
DoorDoorDoorDoorDoor
DoorDoorDoorDoorDoor
DoorDoorDoorDoorDoor
DoorDoorDoorDoorDoor
DoorDoorDoorDoorDoor
DoorDoorDoorDoorDoor
DoorDoorDoorDoorDoor
DoorDoorDoorDoorDoor
DoorDoorDoorDoorDoor
DoorDoorDoorDoorDoor 

 

Kikolani Martinez, now an 11th grader at Kamehameha Schools Kapälama, offers the following explanation of her work:

“I created a concrete poem with three different concrete poems fused together. There are three doors in my concrete poem, one in Hawaiian, one in Pidgin, and one in English. These three doors represent the different sides that I, as a Hawaiian, must face. I must speak differently in different situations. First, on the left, is the Hawaiian door. This one represents the more Hawaiian side of me. I speak Hawaiian when I am communicating with küpuna, or when I am in my Hawaiian language class. But usually, there are not many other times where I am privileged to use my mother language because there are not many who do speak it, or want to. Therefore, this door is “sad” because it is not opened as much as it should. There are not many opportunities. It wants to be opened, and I want to open it. It is a part of my culture and my heritage. So it is a special door.”
 

  

 

 

 

 

 

© Kikolani Martinez 2006